Tag Archive | handicapped

How to take care of a handicapped dog

Many diseases can also rob a dog of their mobility and yet, the mind is as sharp as ever. These are the difficult choices. When you love your pet, it can be difficult to see him struggle with daily activities that other pets take for granted. It is, therefore, important to know how to take care of a handicapped dog. But we must always remember, animals live in the present. While they may feel frustration, they don’t dwell on ‘what could be.’

 

How do handicapped dogs feel for themselves?

hjdjd874Dogs with disabilities never look down on themselves – as humans, we are the ones that do that. The beauty of being a handicapped dog is you don’t think about it – it just “is.” Disabled dogs believe in themselves and don’t think about how their legs used to work.

Most disabled dogs will accept your assistance. We had a dog named Shadow that was extremely aggressive to humans his entire life. When he came down with Degenerative Myelopathy, I worried that he would not allow us to assist him…but to my surprise he did! He graciously accepted our help because though dogs have dignity, they aren’t bound by egotistical pride. I guess that’s how dogs have tolerated being man’s best friend for thousands of years!

Always face the current situation with your disabled dog, as he’ll be strong in the same situation. A disabled dog appreciates our compassion for them. Because dogs give unconditional love, they expect it in return, so we humans have a lot to live up to!

A disabled dog knows we care about his needs. A disabled dog knows we’ve done our best and when the time comes, he also knows you will be there with him to help him from pain. I think in many ways, uncontrollable pain is one of the main reasons to let a disabled dog go. Dogs tend to fear pain because they know they are vulnerable. If the disability is not painful, then they have nothing to fear so will just get on with their lives.

Exercise help disabled dogs

hgdhd874Many dogs with disabilities can benefit from the exercise a doggy wheelchair provides. While he may not want to be in it 24/7, it does give him a chance to play with other dogs, explore, sniff scents, and provide needed exercise for wasting muscles. A 10-minute walk in his “wheels” can do wonders for his mental health.

One thing you must do with special needs dogs is to give them status within your pack. This is particularly important when you have more than one dog. For a dog, the pack is everything, and he will look to you to protect him from pack members that have less noble motives.

Owning a dog with special needs can bring you closer, and is a special thing to do and appreciate this hectic lives.